Review: Gilded Age Murder & Mayhem in the Berkshires by Andrew K. Amelinckx

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Murder and dark deeds shadowed the extravagance of the Gilded Age in the Berkshires of Massachusetts. In the summer of 1893, a tall and well-dressed burglar plundered the massive summer mansions of the upper crust. A visit from President Teddy Roosevelt in 1902 ended in tragedy when a trolley car smashed into the presidential carriage, killing a Secret Service agent. Shocking the nation, a psychotic millworker opened fire on a packed streetcar, leaving three dead and five wounded. From axe murders to botched bank jobs, author Andrew Amelinckx dredges up the forgotten underbelly of the Berkshires with unforgettable stories of greed, jealousy and madness from the Gilded Age.

For those interested in the history of crime, this is an interesting book about forgotten crimes from American history. You’d think one of the first mass public shootings would be something you heard more about in other histories of crime, and yet the tragic mass killing in a streetcar by a mentally disturbed man remains largely forgotten. The author’s style is rather sparse and these feel more like magazine or newspaper articles than a deep introspection of the events or time period. It is an interesting little book though and while some of the stories occasionally get a little dry with facts, the events themselves are so bizarre and pretty much undocumented on the whole that the book is interesting in spite of that.

4 out of 5

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